Cold Asian Noodles

Cold Asian NoodlesIngredients:

8 oz egg noodles
3 T soy sauce, low sodium
2 T rice vinegar
2 T vegetable oil
2 T water
1 T palm sugar, or brown sugar
1 T sesame oil
3 garlic cloves, minced
1/2 t ginger, minced
1/4 t ground black pepper
Pinch salt, or to taste
2 scallions, white and light parts, sliced Read More


Recipe of the Week: Basic Hummus

This recipe is from The Archive under The Spoon Mage™ Explains.
Basic Hummus 250.jpg

Do you have a favorite brand of hummus or do you enjoy it at one particular restaurant because they make it so perfectly? You don’t have to go out –  make it yourself.

Once you have mastered hummus basics, check out the ideas below the recipe to take your hummus beyond the ordinary. Enjoy it often – it’s good for you. I love to dip carrots, radishes, and cucumbers in my hummus. Or try it on sandwiches as a replacement for mayo.

ps – It’s not cheating to use canned garbanzo beans. It’s just easy.

Basic Hummus

Ingredients:

1 (15 oz can) garbanzo beans (chickpeas), drained and rinsed
2 T extra virgin olive oil
2 cloves garlic
1 T tahini
2 T fresh lemon juice
Sea salt and pepper to taste
3 T olive oil  (you may use less or more to taste)
Optional Ingredients: see below for a few delicious suggestions

Click here for the Directions.


Asian-American Shrimp Pad Thai

Ingredients:

8 oz medium or large flat rice noodles
1 lb wild caught medium shrimp, thawed if from frozen, shelled, and deveined
3 t cornstarch, divided use
1/4 cup fish sauce
3 T fresh lime juice
2 T soy sauce
1 T ketchup
1/4 cup palm sugar
1 T brown sugar
1 T rice wine vinegar
1 t crushed red pepper, or to taste
1/8 t ground white pepper, or to taste
1/4 cup water
4 T peanut oil, divided use
1 1/2 T garlic, minced
1 small shallot, minced
2 large eggs beaten
2 cups bean sprouts
4 scallions, sliced
2 t sesame oil
1/2 – 3/4 cup lightly smashed unsalted dry roasted peanuts
2 T cilantro
1 lime quartered
hot chile oil to taste Read More





Mindfulness Revisited: The Importance of Words

enjoy the peace

At the start of a new year, many folks think about going on a diet. The word is not often accompanied by feelings of joy.

When you think of eating a cookie as failing or “breaking” your diet, you might berate yourself … or “give in” and go for more forbidden bites which makes you feel as if you personally are a failure and just cannot succeed with a diet. You are not a failure. That sort of thinking is the result of what you have been trained to think when you see the word diet.

Read more here.


Recipe of the Week: Black-Eyed Peas, Creole Style

Start the New Year off right with a southern meal designed to create plenty of luck for everyone at the dinner table. Black eyed peas form the solid foundation of a tasty southern New Year’s Day tradition. To bring financial good fortune, serve up a side of your favorite leafy green. Mustard greens are standard, but you can use any leafy green you love – spinach, cabbage, or the interesting greens from sweet potatoes.

What delicious New Year’s Day traditions do you enjoy?

Happy New Year!

Ingredients:

4 oz bacon, cut into 1 inch pieces
4 oz ham, cut into 1 inch pieces
1 onion, chopped
1 green pepper, deseeded and chopped
1 cup celery, chopped – include some of the delicious leaves
4 garlic cloves, minced
1 jalapeno, deseeded, and minced
2 t Creole seasoning mix
1 t dried thyme
3/4 t dried oregano
1/2 t dried basil
2 bay leaves
1 pound black-eyed peas, sorted, rinsed, and soaked
1 (15 oz) can diced tomatoes
4 cups chicken stock
Water as needed

Garnish: sliced green onion

Click here for directions.



The Three Meals of Christmas

The tree will be fresh cut, the decorations will be nature or music inspired, the wreath my Grandma made will be hung, the nutcrackers shall increase in number, and books and music will rule the gifts.

While I schedule like a pro, I am not big on planning too far ahead for meals. It’s more fun to think about what I want to eat that day and make it! But, as stores are closed or have limited hours, holidays are a different story. And so, I plan, chat with my favorite butcher at the meat market, and shop accordingly.

Fortunately, it’s really quite easy to create a list of meals for our family’s traditional Three Meals of Christmas. Tradition is the buzz word in that sentence. I am allowed a certain amount of experimentation, but the food tradition basics, just like the decorative elements, must remain the same. I’ve come to terms with this and gradually tweaked the menu to make me happy to repeat it.

Read More